Tag: Fourth of July

Happy Fourth of July!

Debbie Reynolds celebrating the Fourth of July

At Chez Gallagher, we’re very excited about the holiday. We may not be as hands on with the holiday celebrations as Debbie is above, but we’ve got a full slate of activities planned. One I’d like to share with you.  If you’d like to step back in time and experience a live old time radio-style Fourth of July broadcast, then you should tune into Maxwell DeMille‘s Club Cicada tonight.

Club Cicada is somewhere I’ve meant to go, but haven’t yet. It’s a Sunday night, retro-style night club, where the ladies and gents are always well-dressed. Even without the weekly party, how could they resist dressing up for the James Oviatt Building, which is a gorgeous art deco highrise?

Lucky for those of us whose geography distances them from the nightclub, it continues the tradition of live music broadcasts. The modern twist is that you only need a decent internet connection to catch their webcast, complete with video. Tonight’s program features Dean Mora and his 18-Piece Orchestra performing a tribute to the armed forces. It starts at 8:30 PM PST tonight.

Happy Fourth of July!

We’ve been enjoying a comfy, cozy holiday at home today. It’s nice to take a time-out when we’re normally busy rushing about. We’ve been playing old time radio programs all day, some holiday-related. I was surprised when my husband found an episode of Yankee Yarns set in my hometown of Fairhaven, Massachusetts, about one particular Fourth of July celebration.

Here’s Old Time Radio Cat‘s description of the series:

Yankee Yarns is an entertaining show about New England created by Alton H. Blackington. Touting himself as a storyteller, Alton weaves tales that are alternately amazing, eccentric, horrifying and comical. His “yarns” include stories of the sticky Boston streets of 1919, when a gigantic tank of molasses burst and coated the town, or of silly Connecticutians who gather a pool of $10 million to mine gold at the bottom of the ocean.

Yankee Yarns found themselves being told in many forms throughout the years, from radio to newspaper stories to lectures, and finally in a book. Radio listeners pestered Alton long and hard for scripts of his broadcast, so much so that he finally wrote himself a book in 1954. So whether you’re in the mood for a spine tickle or a throat giggle, Yankee Yarns will leave you satisfied.

This particular episode concerns a group of boys, one of them a Delano, who cannot abide by a fireworks curfew. Instead they construct an elaborate plan on how literally to shake things up for the holiday.  They build their own “bombs”, which they plant around town and set off at midnight, driving the local police crazy. The whole tale is narrated in an unmistakable New England accent, lending a bit of local color to the proceedings.